About Tai Chi and Qigong

Is Taiji or Qigong right for me?

Many people start these arts thinking about the beauty that they have observed in others' practice. Part of the beauty comes from years of practice resulting in extreme relaxation, the other part is Qi (chi). Many people don't realize the journey they are about to start. They think the practice is like a gym membership: I will go for awhile until I do something else. Others will not realize that to build your Qi, to gain exercise, to improve your balance, to make your life better, requires some effort. In most cases, it's the poor expectations that they set for themselves that causes them to stop practicing. As teachers, we practice 2-3 times per week. Are you prepared to practice at least once per week, for at least 20-30 minutes, plus attend class?

Taijiquan (Tai Chi Chuan) means: "The Grand Ultimate Fist." The Grand Ultimate means that through our movements, we can embody all that there is, and when we are done, we can stop, be silent, and return to the Wuji (Wu Chi).

Well, what does all of that mean? It means different things to different people. Are you ready to find the meaning for yourself, or do you want to be told? We are seekers. We want some gentle exercise; some meditation; some balance; some energy. We attend classes because we want to share our insights and explore differences.

Taijiquan is the most well-known of the internal martial arts. The other two are Xingyi (Ching Yi) and Baguazhan.

Qigong (Chi Kung) is a mastery of moving energy through your body. QIgong is an important foundation of Taijiquan. If you don't move, you don't generate energy and if you aren't mindful of your movements, you might not be able to fully direct the energy. The movements are relatively simple and can be done seated for those that have physical ailments.

Of all of the movements, the most helpful in Qigong is the fact that we work most of our muscles/muscle groups and we work to relax opposing muscles at the same time.